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Tripura pilgrim dies in Mecca

first_imgA 58-year-old Hajj pilgrim from Tripura’s Sipahijala district passed away at Mecca on Friday due to a cardiac arrest, a family member said. Abdul Saiyad, a resident of Srimantapur village in Sipahijala, had left for the pilgrimage on July 26 along with 150 others from the State. His son, Kamal Hussain, said Saiyad was taken to the hospital on Thursday night in Mecca after he complained of chest pain and uneasiness. He passed away on Friday at 5.45 a.m.He added that Saiyad was buried at a cemetery in Mecca. When contacted, Tripura Haj Committee chairman Md. Jasim Uddin said he will be visiting the house of Saiyad on Saturday. “We are deeply saddened by the death of Abdul Saiyad. I hope his family gets strength to cope with the loss.”last_img read more

‘Space Vikings’ Spark NASA Inquiry

first_imgFor Ved Chirayath, an aeronautics and astronautics graduate student and amateur fashion photographer, a photo project that involved NASA researchers dressed as Vikings was just a creative way to promote space science. “I started this project hoping maybe one day some kid will look at it and say, ‘I want to work for NASA,’ ” says Chirayath, a student at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who also works nearby at NASA’s Ames Research Center (ARC).He never suspected that his fanciful image would put him in the crosshairs of a government waste investigation triggered by a senior U.S. senator.Earlier this month, Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA), the Senate Judiciary Committee’s top Republican, wrote to NASA chief Charles Bolden, asking him to investigate whether Chirayath’s photos involved the possible misuse of ARC funds and staff time. An “interested observer” had brought the photos to Grassley’s attention, Jill Gerber, the senator’s communications manager, tells ScienceInsider. In his 10 July letter, Grassley raised concerns about NASA spending on “non-mission critical activities” and asked Bolden to help him “better understand the participation of NASA employees and resources in this for-profit photography exhibit.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Soon, agency investigators were asking questions—much to Chirayath’s surprise. “They made contact with just about every person who took part in the shoot,” he says. But there’s no smoking gun, he adds. His effort was strictly not-for-profit and didn’t involve ARC funds.It all started in 2011, when Chirayath—a photo enthusiast whose subjects have included astronomical objects, marine and natural subjects, and nonprofit work he did in Kenya—was looking for ways to combine his love of fashion photography, laboratory-grade optical effects, and scientific topics. He applied for and won two Stanford University grants—totaling $4400—to create Physics in Vogue, an exhibition featuring 10 images that explore “profound contemporary physics discoveries.”Last year, Chirayath began working at ARC, where he helps develop small, compact research satellites known as “CubeSats.” The technology, developed in part at Stanford, reminded him of Viking explorers who, from the eighth through 11th centuries, “travelled farther and saw more in much smaller ships than had been used before their time.” That connection inspired his Space Vikings photos, which led to a shoot this past December at a Palo Alto park on a weekday afternoon.To stage the scene, Chirayath partnered with the Vikings of Bjornstad, a living history group that likes to dress up. He also recruited ARC Director Simon Worden, Chief of Staff Karen Bradford, and executive secretary Carolina Rudisel to slip into costume. The satellite mock-ups were on loan from Pumpkin Inc., run by a Stanford engineering professor.After he posted the pictures online, Chirayath heard rumblings from co-workers that a blogger took issue with the executive staff’s appearance. He thought little of it until investigators started asking questions.In the past, Grassley and other lawmakers have taken issue with ARC’s use of money, including whether it improperly housed aircraft owned by Google at NASA facilities. In this case, all Grassley wants is “a simple explanation” of the photos, Gerber says. “And that’s what he’s hoping to receive from NASA.” NASA News Chief Allard Beutel says that although the agency has yet to send an official reply, it has concluded that “there were no taxpayer funds used” for Space Vikings. “The employees were on their time, not on work time.”  The flap has left Chirayath perplexed. “NASA can’t afford to promote their missions in this way and this is partly why I started this project,” he says. And that’s ironic, he adds, because “more was probably spent in taxpayer employee man-hours investigating me, my exhibition, and those involved than it might have cost” to produce the photos professionally.*Correction, 26 July, 11:25 a.m.: Ved Chirayath is an aeronautics and astronautics graduate student, not an astrophysics graduate student, as previously reported. This has been corrected.last_img read more

Colorful corals protect the algae inside

first_imgEcologists have long wondered how two coral reefs—sitting right next to each other in the ocean—can be drastically different shades of color. The answer, according to a new study, has to do with some intriguing genetics. By sequencing three colonies of Acropora millepora, a branching stony coral obtained from the waters of Fiji, scientists have discovered that instead of having one gene that controls pigment production, these corals harbor multiple copies of the same gene. The more genes the corals activate, the greater their strength of color, researchers report online this month in Molecular Ecology. The same pigments that are essential for the corals’ color are also important for protecting the algae that live inside the corals, the team reports. Algae require some sunlight to survive, but too much light kills them. To protect the algae, which provide them with essential nutrients, the corals that are exposed to the most sunlight invest the sun’s energy into producing more pigment and thus appear brighter; this prevents too much sunlight from reaching the algae.last_img read more

Found: Two sophisticated mammals that thrived during the age of the dinosaurs

first_imgResearchers have discovered what may have been the world’s first burrowing and tree-climbing mammals—two shrew-sized critters that lived in what is today China during the age of the dinosaurs. The fossils add to the growing evidence that, far from cowering in the dinosaurs’ shadow, early mammals were highly successful, specialized animals in their own right.The new finds “give us a very different view of mammal life during the age of dinosaurs,” says John Wible, an expert in mammalian evolution at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who was not involved in the work.Dinosaurs first appear in the fossil record about 230 million years ago, and paleontologists have recently discovered fossil mammals dated to just 20 million years later. Yet scientists had long assumed that the earliest mammals were mostly nocturnal, staying out of sight and living largely on insects and other food that dinosaurs were not interested in. That picture has begun to change, however, with the discovery of a number of early mammals that were well adapted to a variety of ecological niches, including eating plants that huge vegetarian dinosaurs also munched on.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Among these small but versatile creatures were the docodonts, shrew-sized mammals that looked somewhat like a cross between a rat and a squirrel, bearing sharp-edged molars good for shearing, crushing, and grinding plants and other food. In 2006, for example, a team led by paleontologist Zhe-Xi Luo, now of the University of Chicago, reported the discovery in China of a 164-million-year-old docodont named Castorocauda lutrasimilis, which apparently not only swam but might also have eaten fish—adaptations not previously known among such early mammals.In two papers in this week’s issue of Science, a team led by Luo and paleontologist Qing-Jin Meng of the Beijing Museum of Natural History reports the discovery of two new, shrew-sized docodonts that boost this picture of early mammalian diversity. The team claims that one of them, a 165-million-year-old creature named Agilodocodon scansorius, is the earliest known tree-climbing mammal, possibly eating tree sap with its specialized teeth; the other, 160-million-year-old Docofossor brachydactylus, had shortened, shovel-like paws and may be the earliest known burrowing mammal.The two fossils were found over the past several years by farmers in the fossil-rich shale outcrops called the Tiaojishan Formation in northeast China and acquired by the Beijing Museum of Natural History in the form of shale slabs in which the delicate bones were embedded. Mindful of numerous controversies concerning the authenticity of fossils found in China, the team verified that the fossils really did come from the Tiaojishan Formation, matching both the geology of the slabs as well as Jurassic invertebrates also found in them. The researchers then prepared the fragile fossils for study, using CT scanning—the same CT scanning doctors use to diagnose human bone and soft tissue ailments—to reveal the details of their tiny skulls and teeth (as shown in the video below). Agilodocodon scansorius (meaning “agile docodon” with a scansorial, or climbing, adaptation) was about 13 centimeters from head to tail and weighed about 27 grams, roughly the size of a house mouse. It looked like a squirrel with a long snout instead of a short one, the team reports, with curved, horny claws and flexible ankle and wrist joints typical of modern climbing mammals like squirrels and monkeys. Moreover, its front teeth were shaped like spades, leading the researchers to conclude that it could gnaw tree bark and feed on gum or sap.Docofossor brachydactylus (“Doco” for docodont; “fossor” for fossorial, or digging, adaptations; and “brachydactylus” for short, broad fingers) had a striking resemblance to the modern African golden mole, a burrowing mammal that lives underground. It was about 7 centimeters long and weighed about 16 grams, the size of a small shrew, and had a wide stance typical of burrowing animals. Like the golden mole, Docofossor had shovel-like fingers ideal for digging. Moreover, unlike most mammals, Docofossor had only two phalanges (bone segments) in most of its fingers instead of the usual three, which led to shortened but wider digits.The researchers note that in modern mammals the number of segments is largely controlled during development by two specific genes (called BMP and GDF-5), and they suggest that natural selection was operating on the same genes as early as 160 million years ago. If so, Luo says, it would imply that the evolutionary groundwork for this surprising diversity and adaptiveness among early mammals was laid down much earlier than researchers suspected. “With each new discovery it becomes increasingly clear that the [earliest] mammals had the same evolutionary mechanisms as modern mammals,” he says.These adaptations may have played an important role in the later success of modern mammals once the dinosaurs went extinct about 66 million years ago, says Richard Cifelli, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, who was not involved with the work.Still, Frietson Galis, an evolutionary developmental biologist at Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands, questions whether Agilodocodon really gnawed bark and ate tree sap. She says its teeth “are quite different” from the modern sap-eating monkeys that the team compared it with, and the long, thin lower jaw seems to her too weak for chomping on tree bark. She and Wible also question whether the reduction in finger digits in Docofossor really employed the same genes as in modern mammals.Luo himself cautions against “overstretching” the conclusions about the versatility of early mammals. Although the new discoveries are an antidote to “stereotypical thinking” about cowering, timid mammals, he says, it is still true that our distant ancestors stayed pretty small until the monstrous dinosaurs were safely out of the way.(Video credit: April I. Neander, University of Chicago)last_img read more

Six held in Meerut for bursting crackers after Ayodhya verdict

first_imgMeerut police on Saturday arrested six people at two different places in the city for bursting crackers after the Supreme Court’s Ayodhya verdict on Saturday.A statement released by the media cell of the police said three youngsters were arrested from the Sohrabgate bus stand of the city. They have been booked for bursting crackers when Section 144 was imposed in the district. The arrested have been identified as Apoorva, Surendra and Praveen, residents of the Nauchandi area of Meerut. Watch | Ayodhya verdict: Land allotted for the construction of a Ram temple Ayodhya verdictVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:3201:32  center_img Police have also arrested three persons from the Brahmpuri area of the city for violating Section 144.Earlier, the police arrested Lakshman Singh, a resident of Pandav Nagar in Civil Lines area of Meerut, for posting a provocative Facebook post.last_img read more

Virat Kohli can get more runs than Sachin Tendulkar: Chaminda Vaas

first_imgChaminda Vaas was to Sri Lankan cricket what Javagal Srinath was to Indian cricket. Assigned with the task to deliver  on spinner friendly surfaces at home, sometimes even as a solitary fast bowler in the playing eleven, the left-armer ticked all the right boxes. (IPL Full Coverage|Points Table) In the process he got 355 test wickets for Sri Lanka and never complained.  “As a fast bowler my job was to bowl well even if it was a desert. That’s the spirit  you have to keep. Bend your back and get wickets. Try to enjoy bowling, no matter whatever the surface,” he tells India Today. (Also read: Harbhajan Singh takes fitness tips from Virat Kohli) The Sri Lankan pacer is in Mumbai at friend and cricketer Jwala Singh’s T20 competition.’TOUGH ONE TO ANSWER’Five years into retirement, the fast bowler’s ‘competitive spirit’ is still intact. When asked if at his prime, which of Virat Kohli, AB De villiers or Chris Gayle would he least like to bowl to, this is what Sri Lanka’s left arm great had to say, “When I was bowling, I loved to bowl to Gayle. Got him out many times. But it is a tough one to answer. They may all be good batsmen but as a fast bowler if you put the ball in right area, can get anyone out.” (Also read – Virat Kohli on record-shattering fourth hundred: It was unbelievable!)’GENIUS VIRAT’Yet when asked to evaluate Virat’s superlative form of late, he wasn’t economical in praise. “Virat is a genius. We can see from his consistency. We saw when Sachin was a youngster he did the same. I am sure he will be able to do the same things and get many more runs for India,” he predicted.advertisementHOPES ON BHUVNESHWAR KUMARHaving played initial seasons of IPL and observed Indian cricket closely, Vass is hopeful Bhuvneshwar Kumar, one of the few swing bowlers in Indian cricket will learn to find the right balance between yearning for pace and keeping swing in tact. “He is still young. He is someone who has played lot of odi cricket. IPL itself is very competitive so one has to learn variations. When you try to bowl fast you can lose swing. But he will have to keep in mind that you have to have both, develop that ability which comes with practice,” he observed.’BUMRAH, A GOOD LEARNER’Vaas had a word of praise for India’s new find Jasprit Bumrah, who has been an understudy to fellow countryman, Lasith Malinga in the IPL.”Lasith is one of the greatest bowlers in the world with ability to bowl yorkers at will. Bumrah has learnt from him and not surprising that he is doing well. “It’s all  about learning. You have to try to apply from learnings and am sure Bumrah is a good learner. Test cricket is not going to be an easy game. One needs skill to succeed there. He will have to put all his experience of odi cricket to use in test cricket to do well,” Vass said.last_img read more

Samsung Galaxy M30, Realme 3 Pro, Redmi Note 7 Pro: Best phones under Rs 15,000 in June

first_imgCompanies like Xiaomi, Samsung and Realme have proved that you can get fantastic phones under Rs 15,000 today. In fact, this segment is easily one of the most competitive in the Indian market right now. Because of this aggressive competiton between brands, we see phones that offer a terrific mix of premium design language along with great hardware at increasingly affordable prices.Phones under Rs 15,000 today will make you wonder whether it is worth spending a premium on a smartphone. We have phones like the Redmi Note 7 Pro and Realme 3 Pro that are quietly disrupting the market and forcing every other brand to catch up and provide the kind of all-round experience that these phones deliver. Here’s a look at some of the best phones under Rs 15,000 you can purchase today.Redmi Note 7 Pro: Rs 13,999The Redmi Note 7 Pro (Review) is undoubtedly the king under Rs 15,000. The phone is a perfect example of how companies are able to bring high-end, premium materials to the low-end sector. The Redmi Note 7 Pro comes with Gorilla Glass 5 on the front and back and offers a 6.3-inch FHD+ waterdrop display.Under the hood, the Redmi Note 7 Pro packs a Snapdragon 675 chipset and a 4,000mAh battery. But the USP of the Redmi Note 7 Pro is its cameras, which are some of the best you can find in this segment. The dual camera setup on the back includes a 48MP Sony IMX586 sensor that can capture extremely detailed and stunning high-res photos. It also comes with a dedicated Night mode that helps capture some might impressive low-light photos.advertisementRealme 3 Pro: Rs 13,999The Realme 3 Pro (Review) is perhaps the only phone in this segment that can really take on the Redmi Note 7 Pro head-to-head. This is because the Realme 3 Pro also touts an attractive design that includes a 6.3-inch FHD+ dewdrop display and curved glasstic rear panel in attractive gradient colours. While the Realme 3 Pro looks attractive on the outside, it is all power from the inside. The phone is powered by a snappy 2.2Ghz Snapdragon 710 chipset with an Adreno 616 GPU that can smoothly run games like PUBG and Asphalt 9 with ease. Moreover, you also get a 16MP dual camera setup that can take some really impressive photos, a dedicated Nightscape mode for low-light photography and a long-lasting 4,045mAh battery with 20W VOOC 3.0 fast charging support.Samsung Galaxy M30: Rs 14,990Samsung has crowded the budget and mid-range markets with a number of new phones in 2019. The new Galaxy M series is part of the reason and the Galaxy M30 (Review) is easily one of the best Samsung phones available in affordable segment thanks to its Super AMOLED display, triple camera setup and massive 5,000mAh battery.The Galaxy M30 manages to hold strong even compared to the newly launched Galaxy M40 simply for its striking 6.4-inch FHD+ (2340×1080) Super AMOLED display and large battery capacity. The Galaxy M30 is powered by a 1.8GHz octa-core Exynos 7904 chipset and was recently updated to Android Pie with One UI on top.Asus ZenFone Max Pro M2: Rs 11,999Asus has not been aggressive when it comes to smartphone launches, but the few phones that the company has released have managed to impress one and all. The ZenFone Max Pro M2 (Review) is a solid successor to last year’s model that grew quite popular in the country. The ZenFone Max Pro M2 continues the tradition by offering a stock Android interface and a Snapdragon 660 chipset. It also packs a large 5,000mAh battery, sports a 6.26-inch FHD+ notched display and gets a decent 12MP + 5MP dual camera setup. Honor 20i: Rs 14,999If you’re going for attractive looks and a versatile set of cameras, the Honor 20i is as good as they come. The newly launched phone not only offers an attractive teardrop display, but it is also one of the slimmest and lightest phones in the segment. The Honor 20i succeeds the Honor 10 Lite that was launched earlier this year.The Honor 20i sports a 6.21-inch FHD+ (2340×1080) display and is powered by a 2.2GHz Kirin 710 chipset paired with 4GB of RAM. The phone ships with Android 9 Pie with EMUI 9 on top and will receive security updates for the foreseeable future despite the ongoing US ban on Huawei. One key highlight is the triple camera setup that includes a 24-megapixel f/1.8 aperture and you also get an 8-megapixel wide-angle camera and a 2-megapixel depth sensor. It also gets a 32MP selfie camera and a 3,400mAh battery.ALSO READ | OnePlus 7 Pro, Redmi Note 7 Pro, Samsung Galaxy S10+: Best phones to buy in Juneadvertisementlast_img read more

Boys day two NYC wrap up

first_imgIt was built as day two’s match of the round and it did not disappoint.New South Wales Combined Catholic Colleges (NSWCCC) and NSW Combined High Schools (NSWCHS) were the only undefeated teams in Pool B of the boys division after day one of the 2012 X-Blades National Youth Championships (NYC) at Port Macquarie.The winner of the match would be in the box seat to take the top spot in the group.In a high-scoring first 20 minutes, NSWCCC took a 7-4 advantage into the main break.NSWCHS coach Daniel Brown and his NSWCCC counterpart Michael Daher tried to rallied their respective troops with inspiring half-time speeches.The second half was a lot tighter with both teams playing cat-and-mouse with each other.However, NSWCCC held on to record a 10-7 victory.They would have breathed a sigh of relief knowing that they overcame their rivals for the number one position in Pool B.NSWCCC won their other two matches of the day, 8-4 against NSW Touch Development and 15-5 against ACT PiratesNSWCHS bounced back from their defeat at the hands of NSWCCC and completely decimated Tasmania 19-1 and Northern Territory 10-1.Western Tigers, NSW Touch Development and Northern Territory are all vying for third spot while Tasmania and ACT Pirates are several points back.Touch New Zealand under 17s also enjoyed wins on day two.In Pool A, Central Queensland Bulls and Queensland Secondary Schools Touch will battle it out for top spot tomorrow at 9am.Both teams remain undefeated after more solid performances on day two.The Bulls have scored 82 touchdowns at an average of 13.66 touchdowns a match.QSST defence must remain strong otherwise the Bulls could run rampant and defeat the two-time defending premiers.South Queensland Sharks have all but wrapped up third spot on the table but we will have to wait until the end of round seven tomorrow to confirm the other minor placings.Playoffs will begin tomorrow at 1.10pm.Make sure you stay up to date with the NYC by following these websites: NYC – www.nyc.mytouchfooty.comTouch Football Australia – www.austouch.com.auTouch Football Australia’s YouTube channel – www.youtube.com/touchfootballaus Or FOLLOW us on Twitter or LIKE us on our Facebook page. Related LinksBoys day two NYC wrap uplast_img read more

4 days agoGalatasaray striker Florin Andone insists he’d make Brighton return

first_imgGalatasaray striker Florin Andone insists he’d make Brighton returnby Paul Vegas4 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveGalatasaray striker Florin Andone insists he’d be willing to return to parent club BrightonAndone is on a straight loan at Gala and has admitted frustration with his 12 months in England.Though he told AS: “I was misunderstood and I want to make it clear. My year there was not what I expected. I missed that they had confidence in me, I didn’t play more than two consecutive games as a starter. I don’t ask to play every game, because I’m not a megacrack, I just want continuity. “mI came to doubt myself, my abilities, if I really had a level for the Premier… There were many disappointments. It’s not that I don’t want to go back, I respect Brighton, they signed me for six years and they are worrying about me. I just want to feel like a footballer. “It all starts by recovering my best version and being happy.” TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

India vs England, Women’s T20I: India look to end 5-match losing streak

first_img Indo-Asian News Service GuwahatiMarch 6, 2019UPDATED: March 6, 2019 19:48 IST Indian women’s team looks to return to winning ways (BCCI Photo)HIGHLIGHTSIndian women’s team suffered a 41-run defeat vs England in the first T20IThe Indian women’s team has lost five matches in a row in the shortest formatIn the absence of regular skipper Harmanpreet Kaur, Smriti Mandhana is leading the teamIndian women’s tam would want to bounce back and return to winning ways in their second T20 International against England in Guwahati on Thursday.The Indian team has lost five matches in a row in the shortest format, the latest being their 41-run defeat to England in the first T20 on Sunday.Leading up to the T20 World Cup in Australia next year, coach W.V. Raman would be well aware that the team needs to work on a lot of areas.Veteran Mithali Raj, who is likely to retire from the shortest format before the World Cup, would like to get some runs under her belt in the second T20 after scoring just seven in the first.The batting failed in the first rubber with the lower order stemming the rot. The likes of Shikha Pandey (23 not out), Deepti Sharma (22 not out) and Arundhati Reddy (18) did get some runs but the ask was far too much for them in the end.The bowling lacked control too, with the likes of Deepti, Arundhati and Radha Yadav leaking runs.Medium pacer Shikha Pandey (1/18) and leg-spinner Poonam Yadav (0/18) were economical but they would need support from their colleagues to keep the England batters at bay.England are the in-form side with Tammy Beaumont (62 off 57), skipper Heather Knight (40 off 20) and Danielle Wyatt (35) looking good in the last game. The visitors, who produced an all round show, would like to continue their dominance in the second match too.Squads:India: Smriti Mandhana (Captain), Mithali Raj, Jemimah Rodrigues, Deepti Sharma, Taniya Bhatia (wicketkeeper), Bharti Fulmali, Anuja Patil, Shikha Pandey, Komal Zanzad, Arundhati Reddy, Poonam Yadav, Ekta Bisht, Radha Yadav, Veda Krishnamurty, Harleen DeoladvertisementEngland: Tammy Beaumont, Katherine Brunt, Kate Cross, Sophia Dunkley Brown, Freya Davies, Georgia Elwiss, Amy Ellen Jones, Heather Knight (Captain), Laura Marsh, Natalie Sciver, Anya Shrubsole, Linsey Smith, Lauren Winfield, Danielle Wyatt, Alex HartleyAlso Watch:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byJepher Nickels Tags :Follow Smriti MandhanaFollow Heather Knight India vs England, Women’s T20I: India look to end 5-match losing streakIndia vs England, Women’s T20I: The Indian team has lost five matches in a row in the shortest format, the latest being their 41-run defeat to England in the first T20 on Sunday.advertisementlast_img read more

Passport to Sherbrooke Eastern Shore Helps Tourism

first_imgTourists will be lining up again this summer to win prizes by getting stickers in special passports at Sherbrooke Village and other tourism destinations along the eastern shore. Twenty-two tourism operators between Dartmouth and Port Dufferin have formed a partnership with Sherbrooke Village and its Sherbrooke Now marketing alliance to produce the Seacoast Trail 2006 passport program. “We’ve designed the program to encourage visitors in the Halifax area and in Cape Breton to make the eastern shore part of their vacation experience,” said George Brothers, manager of program development for Sherbrooke Village. “We’re building on our successful pilot program last year with continued partnership of seaside businesses and new support from visitor information centres to hand out the passports and stickers, and promote the program throughout the season.” Tourists can stop at participating businesses or provincial visitor information centres and pick up the pocket-sized passports. Visitors can collect stickers from other partners and submit completed passports at visitor information centres in Sherbrooke Village, Sheet Harbour, Musquodoboit Harbour and Fisherman’s Cove. Holders of completed passports are eligible to win a number of prizes, including a vacation package for 2007. Called A Slice of Seacoast Heaven, this seven-day vacation for two will include meals, accommodations and culture, heritage and nature experiences. The package is provided by a number of tourism operators on the eastern shore. Many are Antigonish Eastern Shore Tourist Association members. All participants in the program are listed in the passport. “This program gives businesses the opportunity to market this whole region together,” said Mr. Brothers. “It’s also designed to help collect data on travel patterns, visitor origin, length of stay and referral methods to help us tailor our marketing in the future.” This year’s program will run until Oct. 16.last_img read more

Junior doctors strike work in Bengal has now affected the patients

first_imgKolkata: Health services in West Bengal’s state-run hospitals suffered as juniors doctors on Wednesday continued their strike protesting an attack on a colleague at the NRS Medical College and Hospital in Kolkata. Family members of patients at the state-run SSKM Hospital started a simultaneous protest by occupying the streets outside and blocking traffic on the AJC Bose Road crossing demanding treatment of their ailing kin. “We are trying to attract the Chief Minister’s attention as most of the patients have come from far off places. We want the OPD services to resume so that general people do not suffer,” said a protesting family member. Also Read – City bids adieu to Goddess Durga Earlier, a member of the Doctors’ Forum proposed to cease work at the outpatient departments (OPDs) of all state-run hospitals in West Bengal on Wednesday. “We want some sort of assurance as whenever any incident occurs, the security and administration people are untraceable. It is us (junior doctors) who are beaten up or manhandled,” one of the protesting doctors at NRS Hospital said. Similar scenes of cease-work was witnessed in districts such as Bankura, Birbhum and Coochbehar. Also Read – Centuries-old Durga Pujas continue to be hit among revellers Disturbances erupted at the state-run NRS Hospital on Tuesday morning bringing the regular services to a standstill, after a junior doctor was allegedly beaten up by the kin of a 75-year-old patient who died there late on Monday night. The family members of the deceased patient alleged medical negligence. The intern named Paribaha Mukherjee sustained serious a skull injury in the attack and has been admitted in the intensive care unit of the Institute of Neurosciences in Kolkata’s Park Circus area. His condition is reportedly stable. Consequently, junior doctors locked up the hospital gates, stopped work at the OPD and started a ‘dharna’ to protest against the attack.last_img read more

Groups file response to governments fight against solitary confinement

first_imgVANCOUVER – The head of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association says the group is ready to take on the federal government in a dispute over fixing a law that violates the rights of inmates in solitary confinement.“Frankly, it’s offensive that the government is requiring us to continue this fight to the (B.C.) Court of Appeal and potentially to the Supreme Court (of Canada) when they were elected on a promise to fix this,” Josh Paterson said.He announced Tuesday that the association and the John Howard Society of Canada have filed a response to the government’s appeal of a court ruling that calls on the government to strike down a law on indefinite segregation because it causes permanent psychological harm and can lead to suicide.“If they’re going to fight it, well, we’ll fight it,” Paterson said.B.C. Supreme Court Justice Peter Leask issued his decision in January but suspended it for 12 months to give the government enough time to draft new legislation with strict time limits on confinement that can include 23-hours-a-day isolation.The government appealed the decision in February, saying it needs clarity on the issue from the courts.“They’re doing no such thing,” Paterson said. “Their appeal is an attack on the very finding that Canada’s law on solitary confinement is unconstitutional. They’re arguing to the B.C. Court of Appeal that the court should treat the systemic mistreatment of prisoners in solitary confinement as individual incidents that require no change in the law.”Paterson said the lower court judge accepted ample evidence from inquiries over decades that the law needs to be changed in a meaningful way to protect the rights of inmates, especially those who are Indigenous or mentally ill.“All of their institutional tweaking has not resulted in fixing this problem and that’s why this court in B.C. said, ‘Enough. The law that permits all of this to take place must be changed.’ “Last June, in an effort to stop the trial, the government introduced a bill that would restrict solitary confinement to 21 days, dropping to 15 days after 18 months from the bill’s passage.However, the two groups rejected the change, saying a warden would still have the final say and cases such as the 2007 in-custody death of New Brunswick teen Ashley Smith, who spent more than 1,000 days in segregation, could still happen. The judge rejected the government’s argument.The bill restricting solitary confinement has not passed through Parliament.The two groups launched a legal challenge of so-called administrative segregation in 2015, calling it a cruel and inhumane punishment that can lead isolated prisoners to harm and even kill themselves.A nine-week trial heard from multiple witnesses including former inmates who continue to experience mental health issues after being released and from a father whose 37-year-old son resorted to suicide.Robert Roy testified Christopher Roy was immediately placed in a segregation cell after arriving at Matsqui Institution, a medium-security facility in Abbotsford, and hanged himself two months later, in June 2015.Roy said he learned from Correctional Service Canada documents obtained through a freedom of information request that his son was placed in isolation because there was nowhere else to put him.“I believe my son was not in a healthy state of mind at that point,” he told the trial.Jay Aubrey, a lawyer for the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, said Tuesday that Correctional Service Canada uses multiple reasons, including punishment and safety of prisoners, to justify solitary confinement but it lacks adequate ways to assess people who are suffering from a mental illness.“Christopher (Roy) was given their intro mental-illness checklist,” she said. “He passed that then killed himself by strangulation.”— Follow @CamilleBains1 on Twitterlast_img read more

Glees Jenna Ushkowitz Opens Her Closet For Charity

first_imgJenna Ushkowitz, known for her role as Tina Cohen-Chang on the Fox hit series GLEE, has teamed up with Closets for Causes to raise money for Oceana.Jenna has donated several pieces from her personal closet, including dresses worn on the red carpet and even one dress worn to the first Twilight movie premiere.Oceana is the largest international organization that focuses solely on the ocean conservative. “I’ve worked very closely with Oceana for a few years now. They are just so dedicated and work solely towards preserving our oceans which take up 71% of our earth” says Jenna about Oceana.“Jenna’s continued support and dedication towards protecting our world’s oceans with Oceana is inspiring” said Matt Littlejohn, Vice President of Marketing and Communications. “She’s incredibly thoughtful and continues to impress us with her contributions as an Oceana advocate, fundraiser and voice for the oceans.”The auction includes pieces from an array of designers such as BCBGMAXAZRIA, French Connection, Marc by Marc Jacobs, and Rebecca Taylor.“We are so excited to offer up such great fashions to fans of Jenna and the show GLEE.” States Closets for Causes’ founder Talia Bella, “The pieces are all young, fresh and flirty and they all support an amazing cause.”Jenna’s auction starts on September 17 – find out more at ClosetsForCauses.com.last_img read more

CoucheTard optimistic about loyalty program despite drop in samestore sales

first_imgTORONTO – Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc. says it’s too early to tell what long-term impact dumping the embattled Aeroplan loyalty program at its Esso branded convenience stores will have, but the time it took for the brand to switch to the PC Optimum program has already hampered sales.The Quebec-based retailer behind Circle K stores said in an earnings call on Thursday that it only ended the Aeroplan program on May 31 and PC Optimum wasn’t implemented until August, so the company has had little time to see how the gap will change consumer habits.“We are pretty optimistic,” said the company’s chief financial officer Claude Tessier. “We know generally that loyalty programs have a positive impact on sales.”However, the company’s earnings show the two-month gap between switching to PC Optimum hurt the brand, at least a little.Couche-Tard said the gap contributed to a 3.3 per cent decrease in same-store road transportation fuel volumes in its first quarter, which ended July 22.Still, overall fuel volumes in Canada were up 10.5 per cent, while global volumes increased 32 per cent, as fuel revenues rose to US$10.9 billion from $6.8 billion a year earlier.During the quarter, Couche-Tard, which reports in U.S. dollars, saw a 25 per cent spike in net income attributable to shareholders to $455.5 million from $364.7 million a year earlier.Revenues grew to $14.8 billion from $9.84 billion the year before.The company said its adjusted profit excluding one-time items was $498 million or 88 cents per diluted share, compared with $381 million or 67 per cents per share in the first quarter of 2018.Couche-Tard was expected to earn 82 cents per share in adjusted profits on $13.9 billion in revenues according to analysts polled by Thomson Reuters Eikon.Executives attributed the quarter’s strength to a 6.6 per cent increase in same-store merchandise revenue in Canada, a strong performance of its CST Canada sites acquired a year ago, higher taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco products, and an expansion of its coffee pilot loyalty program.Couche-Tard President Brian Hannasch said the company also saw “significant” growth in tobacco products in the quarter in the U.S., especially in-house tobacco brands, vapour, powdered tobacco placed inside the upper lip and cigars.“Some of this is attributable to manufacturing innovation…but it’s also reflective of our merchandising, the speed at which we’ve been activating new offers and emerging brands, and how we are presenting these offers to our consumers at our stores,” he told analysts.He said the company’s earnings were also lifted by the brand’s food offerings in Canada, which include its baked-on-site products and hot dogs.In Europe, the company’s ice coffee offering that is being tested in multiple locations was seeing “good customer acceptance so far” and was being aided by a hot summer, he said.Keith Howlett of Desjardins Capital Markets said the results beat analyst expectations largely because of higher U.S. fuel margins.“Couche-Tard’s same-store sales performance was substantially superior to that of U.S. peers,” he wrote in a report.On the Toronto Stock Exchange, Couche-Tard’s shares gained 5.26 per cent or $3.32 at C$66.47 in midday trading.Companies in this story: (TSX:ATD.B)last_img read more

Kochhar’s brother-in-law moves court seeking cancellation of LOC

first_imgNew Delhi: Former ICICI Bank CEO Chanda Kochhar’s brother-in-law Rajiv Kochhar moved a Delhi court Wednesday seeking cancellation of look out circular (LOC) against him in an alleged bank loan fraud and money laundering case registered against them.The court is likely to hear the application on Thursday. Chanda, her husband Deepak and Rajiv have been questioned by the Enforcement Directorate, which is probing the case under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA). Rajiv has been questioned by the CBI as well in the same case in the past as well. He is the founder of Singapore-based Avista Advisory. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghRajiv was asked by CBI sleuths about the help he had extended to Videocon in relation to a loan from ICICI Bank, which was part of a Rs 400-billion credit given by a consortium of 20 banks to the group’s main promoter, Venugopal Dhoot. The searches were conducted at the premises of Chanda, her family and Dhoot in Mumbai and Aurangabad. ED registered a criminal case under the PMLA early this year against Chanda, Deepak, Dhoot and others to probe alleged irregularities and corrupt practices in sanctioning Rs 1,875-crore loans by ICICI Bank to the corporate group. The action was based on an FIR registered by the CBI. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroadCBI has named the three as also Dhoot’s companies — Videocon International Electronics Ltd (VIEL) and Videocon Industries Limited (VIL) — in its case. The anti-corruption probe agency also named Supreme Energy, a company founded by Dhoot, and NuPower Renewables, a company controlled by Deepak, in the FIR. It has slapped sections of the Indian Penal Code related to criminal conspiracy, cheating and provisions of the Prevention of Corruption Act on all the accused. The CBI alleged that Dhoot had invested in Nupower through his firm Supreme Energy in a quid pro quo to loans cleared by ICICI Bank after Chanda took over as the CEO of the bank on May 1, 2009.last_img read more

Ottawa budget balances books slashes tax burden for Canadians Joe Oliver

TORONTO — Finance Minister Joe Oliver says the government’s budget fulfills its promise to balance the books while cutting the tax burden for Canadians.During a speech Monday to the Canadian Club of Toronto, Oliver referred back to his first speech as finance minister 13 months ago, when he told the same group that his priority would be creating jobs and stimulating growth across the country.The April 21 budget includes proposals to lower the small business tax rate by two percentage points, nearly double the contribution limit on tax-free savings accounts, and expand tax breaks for seniors and families.Oliver highlighted the government’s promise for a new public transit investment fund worth $1 billion per year by 2019 as part of a solution to transit woes in Toronto and across the country.He also repeated his promise to bring in balanced-budget legislation, which he said would ensure future fiscal discipline.The budget also includes more than $11 billion in new funding for the Canadian military, as well as nearly $300 million to the RCMP, CSIS, and the Canadian Border Services Agency.Oliver said the new money was a clear demonstration of the government’s resolve to fight terrorism.The Canadian PressTerence Corcoran: When it comes to deficits, Finance Minister Joe Oliver has it rightPeter Foster: Read Joe Oliver’s New Balance shoes read more

Elections Commissioner happy with polls conduct

He said that 35 suspects were arrested in relation to election related violations and they will be produced in court.Meanwhile Deshapriya said that he could not announce the exact voter turnout until all the votes are counted.He also said that some media institutions had violated election laws while the internet was also used to spread false propaganda against the Elections Department. (Colombo Gazette) “I am very happy that there were no serious incidents. Most of the complaints we received were only during the last one and a half hours before voting ended,” he said. He said that there were 226 election related complaints filed with the Elections Department but they were not serious in nature. Deshapriya urged the public to accept both victory and defeat peacefully and not harass anyone after the final election result is released.Police spokesman ASP Ruwan Gunasekera said that there were no complaints of any serious incidents reported. Elections Commissioner Mahinda Deshapriya said that he was happy with the manner in which the Parliamentary election was conducted today.Speaking to reporters at a media briefing at the end of the election, Deshapriya said that, when compared to past elections, the election held today was peaceful. read more