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爱上海同城龙凤

Fortnite should stop letting players climb electric poles in game power company

first_imgYes, folks, it’s true: Fortnite is a fantasy realm, with fantasy rules. Please be careful out in the real world. Epic Games A round of Fortnite can have a lot going on: wild characters, loot to snatch, colorful skins to try on and supplies to gather to build protection against other players. The ultimate goal? Be the last one standing. The game’s been out three short years and it’s held on to a pretty solid fanbase.Now a power company in Israel wants Fortnite to make some changes to its game. Not to the guns or the ability to shoot other characters or steal dance moves, but to the players’ ability to climb utility poles. According to a Wednesday report by Reuters, Israel Electricity Corp. sent a letter to the game’s makers, asking that they no longer let Fortnite players scale utility poles, because it could encourage dangerous real-world behavior. In the Monday letter, obtained by Reuters, Israel Electricity said kids climbing utility poles is a real problem that it’s been trying to stop for many years. The power company said Fortnite is responsible for the safety of its players. In case you’re wondering, it’s no joke: Climbing utility poles and the like can kill you.Neither the Israel Electricity nor Epic Games, the creators of Fortnite, immediately responded to requests for comment.  Fortnite’s Epic spectacular at E3 2019 Tags Comments Gaming Video Games 6:20 Now playing: Watch this:center_img 5 16 Photos Share your voice Fortnite How Fortnite, AR and YouTube influence toyslast_img read more

US warns of action after Syria chemical attack

first_imgA man breathes through an oxygen mask, after what rescue workers described as a suspected gas attack in the town of Khan Sheikhoun in rebel-held Idlib. Reuters file photoThe United States and Russia were on a collision course over Syria on Wednesday after a horrific chemical attack so shocked President Donald Trump that Washington threatened unilateral US action.At least 86 people were killed early on Tuesday in rebel-held Khan Sheikhun in northern Syria and dozens more were being treated after they were found convulsing and foaming at the mouth.After previous major chemical attacks in Syria in 2013, Trump strongly urged then-president Barack Obama not to order military intervention against Bashar al-Assad’s regime.And he came to office promising both to improve ties with Assad’s ally President Vladimir Putin of Russia and to focus US efforts in Syria solely on the defeat of the Islamic State group.But on Wednesday—as footage emerged of Syrian children choking to death in agony—he declared that his view of the conflict had been changed by an attack that “cannot be tolerated.”“It crossed a lot of lines for me,” Trump told reporters at a joint White House news conference with Jordan’s King Abdullah, alluding to Obama’s failure to enforce his own 2013 “red line.”“When you kill innocent children, innocent babies, little babies… that crosses many, many lines, beyond a red line, many, many lines,” he warned.“I will tell you, it’s already happened, that my attitude towards Syria and Assad has changed very much… You’re now talking about a whole different level.”Trump did not go into detail about what any US response to the atrocity would be—and he has previously opposed deeper US military involvement in Syria’s civil war.Rethink supportThe US ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, warned of unilateral action and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson urged Russia to rethink its support for Assad.“There is no doubt in our mind that the Syrian regime under the leadership of Bashar al-Assad is responsible for this horrific attack,” Tillerson told reporters.“And we think it is time for the Russians to really think carefully about their continuing support for the Assad regime.”Tillerson is due in Moscow next week for talks that will now be clouded by the Khan Sheikhun controversy.At the United Nations, Haley was equally forthright.“When the United Nations consistently fails in its duty to act collectively, there are times in the life of states that we are compelled to take our own action,” she said.The warning came during an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council called by France and Britain after the attack.Haley, lashing out at Russia for failing to rein in its ally Syria, showed photographs of lifeless children choked in the attack.“How many more children have to die before Russia cares?” she demanded. “If Russia has the influence in Syria that it claims to have, we need to see them use it.”‘Categorically unacceptable’Britain, France and the United States have presented a draft resolution demanding a full investigation of the attack.Russia—along with Iran—is Syria’s main diplomatic and military partner. And Moscow, true to form, said the draft text was “categorically unacceptable.”Failure to agree on a compromise text could prompt Russia to use its veto to block the draft resolution. Moscow has used its veto seven times to shield Syria from UN action.The Western-backed draft text backs a probe by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and demands Syria provide information on its operations.Russia’s deputy ambassador Vladimir Safronkov told the UN council that the proposed resolution was hastily prepared and unnecessary, but voiced support for an inquiry.“The main task now is to have an objective inquiry into what happened,” he said.Russia turned up at negotiations with a rival draft resolution that made no reference to specific demands that Damascus cooperate with an inquiry, diplomats said.Negotiations were continuing on the draft text and diplomats said there would not be a vote before Thursday at the earliest.“We are talking about war crimes here, war crimes on a large scale, war crimes with chemical weapons,” said French Ambassador Francois Delattre.The British ambassador, Matthew Rycroft, told reporters he hoped council members would agree on a draft resolution by Thursday, but vowed to press for a vote regardless.Moscow, which launched a military intervention in 2015 in support of Assad’s forces, defended the government against accusations of responsibility for the attack.It claimed the deaths were caused when a Syrian strike hit a “terrorist warehouse” for bombs containing “toxic substances” and pledged to maintain its military support for Assad.Western experts have dismissed this claim as implausible, given the scale and nature of the casualties.And a senior State Department official said: “Anyone with common sense and the ability to look at pictures knows that what the Russians are saying about the depot is not true.”‘A gas so lethal’Doctors said victims showed symptoms consistent with the use of a nerve agent such as sarin—suspected to have been used by government forces in deadly attacks outside Damascus in 2013.US officials have not said what kind of agent they think was used, but Trump said it was “a chemical gas that is so lethal, people were shocked to hear what gas it was.”If confirmed, the attack would be among the worst incidents of chemical weapons use in Syria’s civil war, which has killed over 320,000 people since it began in March 2011.Syria officially relinquished its chemical arsenal and signed the Chemical Weapons Convention in 2013 to avert military action after it was accused of an attack outside Damascus that killed hundreds.But there have been repeated allegations of chemical weapons use since.last_img read more

UK angered Russia blaming Putin for poisoning spy

first_imgBritain`s prime minister Theresa May visits the city where former Russian intelligence officer Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned with a nerve agent, in Salisbury, Britain on 15 March 2018. ReutersBritain provoked Russia’s wrath on Friday by directly implicating Vladimir Putin in the poisoning attack on an ex-double agent, with the Kremlin saying the claims were “shocking and unforgivable”.The war of words between Moscow and London over the nerve agent attack on a former Russian spy escalated as Britain’s Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said his government’s “quarrel” was with Putin rather than the Russian people.“We think it overwhelmingly likely that it was his decision to direct the use of a nerve agent on the streets of the UK, on the streets of Europe, for the first time since the Second World War,” Johnson said in London.Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov responded saying Johnson’s claims violated all rules of diplomatic protocol.Linking Putin to the attack on Sergei Skripal, who moved to Britain in a 2010 spy swap, “is nothing but shocking and unforgivable behaviour from the point of view of diplomacy”, Peskov told Russian news agencies.The crisis has unravelled in the thick of Russia’s presidential campaign, with Putin expected to win a fourth Kremlin term on Sunday.In a rare joint statement, the leaders of Britain, France, Germany and the United States on Thursday condemned the attack on Skripal and his daughter Yulia-both in a critical but stable condition in hospital-as an “assault on UK sovereignty”.They said there “no plausible alternative explanation” for the use of the Soviet-designed nerve agent other than Russian responsibility.Police officer Nick Bailey, who initially attended to the Skripals, was also in hospital in a critical state, though conscious, but his health has improved and he is now in a stable condition, England’s health service said Friday.Alexander Yakovenko, Russia’s ambassador to Britain, told Channel 4 television that Britain’s response to the attack was a “gross provocation”.He branded the British investigation “untransparent and secret”, adding that there was “no proof” that Skripal was gravely ill.Moscow opens probes -The Kremlin has vehemently denied it had a hand in the poisoning of its former spy in the English city of Salisbury on March 4.London’s key allies have closed ranks against Putin after British Prime Minister Theresa May announced the expulsion of 23 Russian diplomats and suspended high-level contacts, among other measures.On Friday, Russia said it could hit back at Britain at “any minute” with its own raft of punitive measures.The Kremlin has indicated it would expel British diplomats in a riposte to London’s move as well as adopt other measures that would “most suit Moscow’s interests”.“All the steps will be well thought out,” Peskov said.Meanwhile the Investigative Committee, which reports to Putin, opened a probe into the “attempted premeditated murder” of Skripal’s daughter, a Russian national, which it said had been “carried out in a way that was dangerous to the public”.At the same time a separate probe was opened into the mysterious death of Nikolai Glushkov, a Russian exile who was found dead at his London home this week.London’s Metropolitan Police later announced their own murder investigation, saying Glushkov had suffered compression of the neck.Scepticism in Russia -Putin has barely weighed in on the row, telling a BBC reporter this week: “Sort things out from your side and then we will discuss this with you.”Russia insists it had no motive to target Skripal with what Britain says was a highly potent Soviet-designed nerve agent called Novichok, in the first such attack in Europe since World War II.Skripal had taken his daughter, who was on a visit from Moscow, out for lunch before they both collapsed on a bench.Many Russians remain sceptical that the state was responsible and some analysts have not ruled out the involvement of ordinary criminals or rogue agents.The incident revived memories of the fate of Alexander Litvinenko, a Russian dissident who died of Polonium radiation poisoning in a 2006 attack in Britain that London blamed on Moscow.EU president Donald Tusk said Friday that the bloc would discuss the attack at a Brussels summit next week, adding it would send a “clear message”.‘We don’t want Cold War’ -Vil Mirzayanov, a Soviet-era chemist who helped create Novichok but later revealed the existence of Moscow’s classified programme, said terrorists could not produce it.“To create its components one needs powerful labs and very experienced personnel which only exist in several countries,” the now US-based whistleblower told opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta.Britain on Friday said that it had invited the chemical weapons watchdog OPCW to take a sample of the poison for analysis, under Article 8 of the Chemical Weapons Convention.May warned more measures could follow against Russia, noting that the US-led NATO alliance and the UN Security Council had discussed the attack.NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said Friday the alliance did not want a return to Cold War hostilities with Russia while expressing support for Britain’s stance.“We don’t want a new Cold War,” he told BBC radio.last_img