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The USspec Mazda Miata 30th Anniversary Edition sold out in 4 hours

first_img Feb 9 • 2019 Ram 2500 HD gets accessorized with Mopar goodies Chicago Auto Show 2019 Mazda 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Orange you glad it’s time for a 30th Anniversary Edition Mazda MX-5 Miata? Feb 8 • Ram’s Multifunction Tailgate can open like French doors Post a comment Feb 8 • 2019 Chicago Auto Show recap: Big debuts from Mazda, Toyota, Subaru and more Feb 8 • Ram’s Multifunction Tailgate adds a 60-40 split 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous • 42 Photos Mazdacenter_img 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Tags Convertibles Sports Cars Share your voice See All Enlarge ImageEvery 30th Anniversary Miata wears Racing Orange paint. Mazda Mazda unveiled its 30th Anniversary Edition MX-5 Miata on Thursday morning here at the Chicago Auto Show, and just four hours after the order books opened, the entire US allocation was spoken for. Only 3,000 examples of the 30th Anniversary Edition Miata will be built for global consumption, and just 500 were earmarked for the US.All of the cars were reserved via Mazda’s pre-order site, and since no money has actually changed hands, there’s still a chance some buyers will drop out. To that end, Mazda is allowing people to add their name to a wait list.The 30th Anniversary Edition package builds off the fully loaded MX-5 Miata Grand Touring trim, and comes painted in a unique Racing Orange color. Inside, Recaro seats have orange stitching, and the new color makes its way to upgraded brakes at all four corners.Other 30th Anniversary goodies include dark-finish, 17-inch Rays wheels and Bilstein dampers (the latter only on manual transmission models). Both the standard Miata and the retractable hardtop RF can be ordered in 30th Anniversary guise, priced at $34,995 and $37,595, respectively.Like all 2019 model year Miatas, the 30th Anniversary Edition is powered by a 2.0-liter I4 engine, with 181 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual transmission is standard, though the limited-run Miata can be optioned with a six-speed automatic, for a couple hundred bucks more.It’s unclear just how many of the US-allocated Miatas are roadsters and how many are RFs, or how many — if any — are left for the rest of the world. Stay tuned for more details as we get them. 0 reading • The US-spec Mazda Miata 30th Anniversary Edition sold out in 4 hours Chicago Auto Show 2019 More From Roadshowlast_img read more

Sylhet BCL unit dissolved

first_imgBCLSylhet district unit committee of Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL) has been dissolved over the killing its activist Omar Miad, reports UNB.BCL central executive committee took the decision on Wednesday night, said a media release signed by its president Saifur Rahman Shoag and general secretary SM Jakir Hossain.Earlier on Monday, Miad, 22, was stabbed to death in a factional clash near Tilagarh area of the city.Miad’s father filed a case with Shahporan police station on Wednesday night accusing 15 leaders and activist of district unit BCL, including its general secretary Rayhan Chowdhury, activist Tofayel Ahmed, and his brother Fakhrul Islam.Meanwhile, police arrested Tofayel Ahmed and Fakhrul Islam.The BCL central executive committee also asked the post aspirants to submit their Curriculum Vitae to the responsible central leaders within 25 October for forming a new committee.last_img read more

UK angered Russia blaming Putin for poisoning spy

first_imgBritain`s prime minister Theresa May visits the city where former Russian intelligence officer Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned with a nerve agent, in Salisbury, Britain on 15 March 2018. ReutersBritain provoked Russia’s wrath on Friday by directly implicating Vladimir Putin in the poisoning attack on an ex-double agent, with the Kremlin saying the claims were “shocking and unforgivable”.The war of words between Moscow and London over the nerve agent attack on a former Russian spy escalated as Britain’s Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said his government’s “quarrel” was with Putin rather than the Russian people.“We think it overwhelmingly likely that it was his decision to direct the use of a nerve agent on the streets of the UK, on the streets of Europe, for the first time since the Second World War,” Johnson said in London.Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov responded saying Johnson’s claims violated all rules of diplomatic protocol.Linking Putin to the attack on Sergei Skripal, who moved to Britain in a 2010 spy swap, “is nothing but shocking and unforgivable behaviour from the point of view of diplomacy”, Peskov told Russian news agencies.The crisis has unravelled in the thick of Russia’s presidential campaign, with Putin expected to win a fourth Kremlin term on Sunday.In a rare joint statement, the leaders of Britain, France, Germany and the United States on Thursday condemned the attack on Skripal and his daughter Yulia-both in a critical but stable condition in hospital-as an “assault on UK sovereignty”.They said there “no plausible alternative explanation” for the use of the Soviet-designed nerve agent other than Russian responsibility.Police officer Nick Bailey, who initially attended to the Skripals, was also in hospital in a critical state, though conscious, but his health has improved and he is now in a stable condition, England’s health service said Friday.Alexander Yakovenko, Russia’s ambassador to Britain, told Channel 4 television that Britain’s response to the attack was a “gross provocation”.He branded the British investigation “untransparent and secret”, adding that there was “no proof” that Skripal was gravely ill.Moscow opens probes -The Kremlin has vehemently denied it had a hand in the poisoning of its former spy in the English city of Salisbury on March 4.London’s key allies have closed ranks against Putin after British Prime Minister Theresa May announced the expulsion of 23 Russian diplomats and suspended high-level contacts, among other measures.On Friday, Russia said it could hit back at Britain at “any minute” with its own raft of punitive measures.The Kremlin has indicated it would expel British diplomats in a riposte to London’s move as well as adopt other measures that would “most suit Moscow’s interests”.“All the steps will be well thought out,” Peskov said.Meanwhile the Investigative Committee, which reports to Putin, opened a probe into the “attempted premeditated murder” of Skripal’s daughter, a Russian national, which it said had been “carried out in a way that was dangerous to the public”.At the same time a separate probe was opened into the mysterious death of Nikolai Glushkov, a Russian exile who was found dead at his London home this week.London’s Metropolitan Police later announced their own murder investigation, saying Glushkov had suffered compression of the neck.Scepticism in Russia -Putin has barely weighed in on the row, telling a BBC reporter this week: “Sort things out from your side and then we will discuss this with you.”Russia insists it had no motive to target Skripal with what Britain says was a highly potent Soviet-designed nerve agent called Novichok, in the first such attack in Europe since World War II.Skripal had taken his daughter, who was on a visit from Moscow, out for lunch before they both collapsed on a bench.Many Russians remain sceptical that the state was responsible and some analysts have not ruled out the involvement of ordinary criminals or rogue agents.The incident revived memories of the fate of Alexander Litvinenko, a Russian dissident who died of Polonium radiation poisoning in a 2006 attack in Britain that London blamed on Moscow.EU president Donald Tusk said Friday that the bloc would discuss the attack at a Brussels summit next week, adding it would send a “clear message”.‘We don’t want Cold War’ -Vil Mirzayanov, a Soviet-era chemist who helped create Novichok but later revealed the existence of Moscow’s classified programme, said terrorists could not produce it.“To create its components one needs powerful labs and very experienced personnel which only exist in several countries,” the now US-based whistleblower told opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta.Britain on Friday said that it had invited the chemical weapons watchdog OPCW to take a sample of the poison for analysis, under Article 8 of the Chemical Weapons Convention.May warned more measures could follow against Russia, noting that the US-led NATO alliance and the UN Security Council had discussed the attack.NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said Friday the alliance did not want a return to Cold War hostilities with Russia while expressing support for Britain’s stance.“We don’t want a new Cold War,” he told BBC radio.last_img